Spring 2019

Cover Story

Anatomy of a Genius

Da Vinci The Exhibition makes a case for the wandering mind. Being insatiably curious about absolutely everything is what defined Leonardo da Vinci.

By Cristina Rouvalis

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Features


When Warhol Met Mona

Among the muses for Andy Warhol’s early silkscreens: Marilyn, Jackie, and the world’s most famous celebrity sitter.

By Barbara Klein

Objects of Wonder

The central characters in Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s early collections story might surprise you.

By Julie Hannon

CoBrA Rising

Carnegie Museum of Art revives the colorful and complex story of a truly unconventional band of painters in post-WWII Europe.

By Elizabeth Hoover

Also in this Issue


 
Patterns of Looking

Person of Interest

With a burst of color, geometry, and pattern play, Ruth Root’s innovative paintings invite close inspection.

By Hannah Turpin

 
Mentored by the  Masters

Art + Ideas

Generations of Pittsburghers find inspiration at Carnegie Museum of Art’s legendary Saturday art classes, now in their 90th year.

By Cristina Rouvalis

Andy Warhol: By Hand

Sights Unseen

Inside the Archives at The Andy Warhol Museum.

By Julie Hannon

Putting Science In Full View

Giving Forward

How a visit to the museum became a life lesson in supporting what you love, at any age.

By Betsy Momich

Pairing Wall Color and Art

Glad You Asked

A member asks: At Carnegie Museum of Art, some of the walls are painted in beautiful colors that add something to the art. What is the process for choosing the paint?

Q + A: Mark Blatnik

Q+A

In conversation with Carnegie Museum of Art’s chief preparator.

By Julie Hannon

 
Seen + Heard: Spring 2019

Seen + Heard

In brief, what’s new around the museums.

 
Five Things: Spring 2019

Five Things

Art and science news you can use.

First Look

First Look

A glimpse at something new, novel, or rarely seen at Carnegie Museums.

 
Director’s Note: Spring 2019

Director's Note

A message from Jason C. Brown

Big Picture

Collection manager Stephen Rogers examines salamanders in Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s section of herpetology, which boasts more than 230,000 amphibians and reptiles, most of which are preserved in glass jars filled with ethyl alcohol. Others are preserved as skeletons, skins, mounts, or cleared and stained preparations. Photo: Joshua Franzos